Conf: Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: acscarfe2 <acscarfe2@gmail.com>
Subject: ​”​The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, 10th International Whitehead Conference, June 4-7th, 2015, Claremont, California, USA

 

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended
This is an invitation to Participate in “The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, Track 4 of Section IV: ‘Re-envisioning Nature; Re-envisioning Science’, at the 10th International Whitehead Conference, “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization”, June 4-7th, 2015, the Claremont Colleges, sponsored by the Center for Process Studies, Claremont, California, USA.

Darwin never explained to us what really transpired in his “Warm Little Pond,” which was the metaphor he gave in private correspondence symbolizing how life might have originated. Nor did Darwin provide any insight into the connection, if any, between his a-biogenetic hypothesis, and Natural Selection, which he held to be the efficient cause of organismic evolution.

Taking these Darwinian lacunae as our starting point and considering the hypothesis that organisms are selective agents in the evolutionary process, namely, “loci of valuative-selective activity” (Beyond Mechanism: Putting Life Back Into Biology, p. 264), rather than merely objects upon which Natural Selection acts, the focus of this consultation will be to explore how living agents emerged from so-called ‘inanimate nature’ and how they evolved.

Consultation proposals that overlap with the above themes, broadly construed, will be considered for inclusion in this track, especially those discussing the following topics and their connection to process-relational philosophy:

- systems chemistry and systems biology;

- kinetic selection and natural selection;

- natural selection and organic selection;

- biosemiotics;

- self-organization, homeostasis, thermodynamics, and symbiogenesis;

- auto-catalysis, auto-poeisis, and auto-genesis;

- teleology, teleonomy, and teleodynamics;

- materialism, mechanism, and organicism;

- reductionism, holism, and emergentism;

- genetics and epigenetics;

- Darwinism and Lamarckism;

- evolutionary neo-Kantianism;

- consciousness, feeling, and experience in the organic world;

- metabolism and psychosocial metabolism;

- the role of behavior in evolutionary processes;

- metaphysics and scientific inquiry;

- ecological and biological wisdom;

etc…

Note: the format of this track is a working group consultation. We shall be expected to share some of our research with one another as a group prior to the conference, such that our meeting will be maximally oriented toward creative exchange and collaborative initiative.

The final deadline to submit your 150-200 word consultation proposal for this track of the Conference has been extended to: April 4th, 2014, by 11:59pm, ET.

Please visit: www.Whitehead2015.com to register for the conference, AND submit your consultation proposal to Dr. Adam C. Scarfe (University of Winnipeg, Canada) at the following email address: a.scarfe@uwinnipeg.ca

 

Conf: Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: acscarfe2 <acscarfe2@gmail.com>
Subject: ​”​The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, 10th International Whitehead Conference, June 4-7th, 2015, Claremont, California, USA

 

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended
This is an invitation to Participate in “The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, Track 4 of Section IV: ‘Re-envisioning Nature; Re-envisioning Science’, at the 10th International Whitehead Conference, “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization”, June 4-7th, 2015, the Claremont Colleges, sponsored by the Center for Process Studies, Claremont, California, USA.

Darwin never explained to us what really transpired in his “Warm Little Pond,” which was the metaphor he gave in private correspondence symbolizing how life might have originated. Nor did Darwin provide any insight into the connection, if any, between his a-biogenetic hypothesis, and Natural Selection, which he held to be the efficient cause of organismic evolution.

Taking these Darwinian lacunae as our starting point and considering the hypothesis that organisms are selective agents in the evolutionary process, namely, “loci of valuative-selective activity” (Beyond Mechanism: Putting Life Back Into Biology, p. 264), rather than merely objects upon which Natural Selection acts, the focus of this consultation will be to explore how living agents emerged from so-called ‘inanimate nature’ and how they evolved.

Consultation proposals that overlap with the above themes, broadly construed, will be considered for inclusion in this track, especially those discussing the following topics and their connection to process-relational philosophy:

- systems chemistry and systems biology;

- kinetic selection and natural selection;

- natural selection and organic selection;

- biosemiotics;

- self-organization, homeostasis, thermodynamics, and symbiogenesis;

- auto-catalysis, auto-poeisis, and auto-genesis;

- teleology, teleonomy, and teleodynamics;

- materialism, mechanism, and organicism;

- reductionism, holism, and emergentism;

- genetics and epigenetics;

- Darwinism and Lamarckism;

- evolutionary neo-Kantianism;

- consciousness, feeling, and experience in the organic world;

- metabolism and psychosocial metabolism;

- the role of behavior in evolutionary processes;

- metaphysics and scientific inquiry;

- ecological and biological wisdom;

etc…

Note: the format of this track is a working group consultation. We shall be expected to share some of our research with one another as a group prior to the conference, such that our meeting will be maximally oriented toward creative exchange and collaborative initiative.

The final deadline to submit your 150-200 word consultation proposal for this track of the Conference has been extended to: April 4th, 2014, by 11:59pm, ET.

Please visit: www.Whitehead2015.com to register for the conference, AND submit your consultation proposal to Dr. Adam C. Scarfe (University of Winnipeg, Canada) at the following email address: a.scarfe@uwinnipeg.ca

 

Conf: Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Anjan Chakravartty <chakravartty.1@nd.edu>
Subject: CFP: The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

 

The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

5-6 November 2015, University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame’s John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values invites you to a conference on The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research.

Plenary
Peter Kareiva is Chief Scientist at the Nature Conservancy, a non-profit organization that collaborates with industry. He has held positions in academia for 20 years and in government with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Call for abstracts
Historical scandals involving industry-funded research, together with empirical evidence of correlations in some areas of science between industry funding and research results favorable to industry have undermined trust in industry-funded science. And yet, it is unrealistic and wasteful to dismiss industry-funded research across the board as unreliable and unconcerned with the public good. What to do? Government reports and scholarly publications are currently extolling the value of public participation in scientific research, and a number of funding agencies are now encouraging initiatives such as community-based participatory research (CBPR). Could the participation of citizen groups in industry-funded research also prove valuable—to increase the relevance, reliability, and acceptability of industry research?

Papers are invited from scholars working in any area relevant to the conference topic, including philosophy, history, the private sector, government, non-profit organizations, the sciences, and other areas of the humanities. Sample topics include (but are not limited to):

- Philosophical and historical perspectives on collaborative research
- Case studies of collaborative scientific research
- Public perceptions of scientific research produced in a collaborative manner
- Legal guidelines and regulations for handling research collaborations
- Ethical principles for managing research collaborations
- Empirical research on the results of research collaborations
- Barriers and opportunities associated with collaborative research

This conference is one in a series of events organized in association with the consortium for Socially Relevant Philosophy of/in Science and Engineering (SRPoiSE), of which the Reilly Center is a member. More information about SRPoiSE is available at http://srpoise.org/.

Abstract Submission
The abstract submission deadline is Monday, June 1, 2015. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words. Abstracts will be refereed and results communicated to authors by June 30, 2015.

Abstract submission is electronic at: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=c3. If you do not have an EasyChair account, you can create one. After logging in, click the ‘New Submission’ link. Add your abstract to the field provided. You can revise your submission any number of times before the deadline.

Registration, travel, accommodations, further information
The Collaboration Conundrum Conference will be held at Notre Dame’s Conference Center. A block of rooms is being held at Morris Inn of Notre Dame, please mention the Collaboration Conundrum Conference when making hotel reservations with the Morris Inn (morrisinn.nd.edu or 800-280-7256).

All conference-related information will be posted on the Reilly Center’s website at reilly.nd.edu. Further inquiries may be addressed to Tori Davies at tdavies@nd.edu and 574-631-5015.

Program Committee
Anjan Chakravartty, University of Notre Dame
Kevin Elliott, Michigan State University
Janet Kourany, University of Notre Dame

Conf: The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Anjan Chakravartty <chakravartty.1@nd.edu>
Subject: CFP: The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research
5-6 November 2015, University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame’s John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values invites you to a conference on The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research.

Plenary
Peter Kareiva is Chief Scientist at the Nature Conservancy, a non-profit organization that collaborates with industry. He has held positions in academia for 20 years and in government with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Call for abstracts
Historical scandals involving industry-funded research, together with empirical evidence of correlations in some areas of science between industry funding and research results favorable to industry have undermined trust in industry-funded science. And yet, it is unrealistic and wasteful to dismiss industry-funded research across the board as unreliable and unconcerned with the public good. What to do? Government reports and scholarly publications are currently extolling the value of public participation in scientific research, and a number of funding agencies are now encouraging initiatives such as community-based participatory research (CBPR). Could the participation of citizen groups in industry-funded research also prove valuable—to increase the relevance, reliability, and acceptability of industry research?

Papers are invited from scholars working in any area relevant to the conference topic, including philosophy, history, the private sector, government, non-profit organizations, the sciences, and other areas of the humanities. Sample topics include (but are not limited to):

- Philosophical and historical perspectives on collaborative research
- Case studies of collaborative scientific research
- Public perceptions of scientific research produced in a collaborative manner
- Legal guidelines and regulations for handling research collaborations
- Ethical principles for managing research collaborations
- Empirical research on the results of research collaborations
- Barriers and opportunities associated with collaborative research

This conference is one in a series of events organized in association with the consortium for Socially Relevant Philosophy of/in Science and Engineering (SRPoiSE), of which the Reilly Center is a member. More information about SRPoiSE is available at http://srpoise.org/.

Abstract Submission
The abstract submission deadline is Monday, June 1, 2015. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words. Abstracts will be refereed and results communicated to authors by June 30, 2015.

Abstract submission is electronic at: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=c3. If you do not have an EasyChair account, you can create one. After logging in, click the ‘New Submission’ link. Add your abstract to the field provided. You can revise your submission any number of times before the deadline.

Registration, travel, accommodations, further information
The Collaboration Conundrum Conference will be held at Notre Dame’s Conference Center. A block of rooms is being held at Morris Inn of Notre Dame, please mention the Collaboration Conundrum Conference when making hotel reservations with the Morris Inn (morrisinn.nd.edu or 800-280-7256).

All conference-related information will be posted on the Reilly Center’s website at reilly.nd.edu. Further inquiries may be addressed to Tori Davies at tdavies@nd.edu and 574-631-5015.

Program Committee
Anjan Chakravartty, University of Notre Dame
Kevin Elliott, Michigan State University
Janet Kourany, University of Notre Dame

 

Position Available: University College Dublin

Job Details
Lecturer (above the bar) in Philosophy, UCD School of Philosophy (Permanent)
Applications are invited for a permanent appointment as Lecturer (above the bar) in Philosophy, UCD School of Philosophy. Please note, 1 or 2 posts may be offered following competition.

This is an academic teaching and research post within the School of philosophy. The School has a particular need for undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and supervision in various aspects of analytic philosophy, including some of the following: epistemology (including social epistemology), logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of religion, philosophy of science, aesthetics, metaphysics, mind and action and moral theory. The range of further possible teaching is quite broad, including periods of the history of philosophy from mediaeval through Modern Philosophy to pragmatism and twentieth century analytic philosophy including Wittgenstein.

It is expected the appointee will contribute to the development of high quality research in analytic philosophy in the School through significant publications and research collaborations and the organisation of and contribution to workshops, seminars and conferences.

Note: It is envisaged an appointee will commence in post on 1 September 2015.

2013 (2010) Lecturer (ATB) Salary Scale: €50,807 – €76,936 p.a.

2013 (2011) Lecturer (ATB) Salary Scale: €45,726 – €69,275 p.a.*
* Subject to all new entrants to public sector as of 01 January 2011

Appointment will be made on scale and in accordance with the Department of Finance guidelines

Closing date: 17:00hrs (GMT) on Monday 30th March 2015

Applications must be submitted by the closing date and time specified. Any applications which are still in progress at the closing time of 17:00hrs on the specified closing date will be cancelled automatically by the system. UCD do not accept late applications.

For more information, please see here.

Conf: Contents of Consciousness

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Jonathan Farrell <jfpttc@yahoo.com>
Subject: Call for abstracts ‘The Contents of Consciousness’ Manchester, UK 20–21 July, 2015

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Workshop: The Contents of Consciousness

Organised by the Architecture of Consciousness project, the University of Manchester

Date: 20–21 July, 2015

Submission deadline: 27 March 2015

The Contents of Consciousness workshop will explore issues pertaining to the admissible contents of phenomenal consciousness. One set of issues concerns the debate between those who hold that only ‘low-level’ properties (such as colour, shape, and texture) can figure in the contents of perceptual experience and those who hold that ‘high-level’ properties (such as being a wombat, being morally permissible, or being a rural scene) can also figure in the contents of perceptual consciousness. Is there any principled way of drawing the contrast between ‘low-level’ and ‘high level’ properties? How might empirical considerations be brought to bear on this debate? Is the debate a genuine one, or are discussants talking past one another, perhaps because of differences in how they interpret the terms employed in the debate? Another set of issues concerns the ways in which features might need to be integrated with each other in order to figure in phenomenal consciousness. Can features enter phenomenal consciousness without being bound together, or is a certain kind of binding a prerequisite of phenomenal admissibility? A third set of issues concerns ways in which accounts of the admissible contents of consciousness might constrain theories of consciousness. Might an account of the contents of consciousness contain clues as to the nature of consciousness? We invite submissions addressing any of these or related questions.

The organisers invite proposals for short presentations (10mins + 5mins Q&A) in which speakers can introduce their work on issues surrounding the contents of consciousness. Abstracts of no more than 500 words suitable for anonymous review should be sent to archofcon@gmail.com by 27th March 2015. Applicants are welcome from all relevant disciplines including (but not limited to) philosophy, cognitive psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience and artificial intelligence. Submissions from graduate students and early- career researchers are particularly welcome. To find out more about the project please visit our webpage at archofcon.wix.com/archofcon and to keep up with future news join our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/archofcon?ref=hl

Invited speakers:
Farid Masrour
Myrto Mylopoulos
Jeff Speaks
David Whitney
Helen Yetter-Chappell

The Contents of Consciousness is the second in a series of workshops held in connection with the University of Manchester’s Architecture of Consciousness project. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC), this project is directed by Prof. Tim Bayne and aims to develop a model of the structural features of consciousness.

 

Conf: The Contents of Consciousness

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Jonathan Farrell <jfpttc@yahoo.com>
Subject: Call for abstracts ‘The Contents of Consciousness’ Manchester, UK 20–21 July, 2015

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Workshop: The Contents of Consciousness

Organised by the Architecture of Consciousness project, the University of Manchester

Date: 20–21 July, 2015

Submission deadline: 27 March 2015

The Contents of Consciousness workshop will explore issues pertaining to the admissible contents of phenomenal consciousness. One set of issues concerns the debate between those who hold that only ‘low-level’ properties (such as colour, shape, and texture) can figure in the contents of perceptual experience and those who hold that ‘high-level’ properties (such as being a wombat, being morally permissible, or being a rural scene) can also figure in the contents of perceptual consciousness. Is there any principled way of drawing the contrast between ‘low-level’ and ‘high level’ properties? How might empirical considerations be brought to bear on this debate? Is the debate a genuine one, or are discussants talking past one another, perhaps because of differences in how they interpret the terms employed in the debate? Another set of issues concerns the ways in which features might need to be integrated with each other in order to figure in phenomenal consciousness. Can features enter phenomenal consciousness without being bound together, or is a certain kind of binding a prerequisite of phenomenal admissibility? A third set of issues concerns ways in which accounts of the admissible contents of consciousness might constrain theories of consciousness. Might an account of the contents of consciousness contain clues as to the nature of consciousness? We invite submissions addressing any of these or related questions.

The organisers invite proposals for short presentations (10mins + 5mins Q&A) in which speakers can introduce their work on issues surrounding the contents of consciousness. Abstracts of no more than 500 words suitable for anonymous review should be sent to archofcon@gmail.com by 27th March 2015. Applicants are welcome from all relevant disciplines including (but not limited to) philosophy, cognitive psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience and artificial intelligence. Submissions from graduate students and early- career researchers are particularly welcome. To find out more about the project please visit our webpage at archofcon.wix.com/archofcon and to keep up with future news join our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/archofcon?ref=hl

Invited speakers:
Farid Masrour
Myrto Mylopoulos
Jeff Speaks
David Whitney
Helen Yetter-Chappell

The Contents of Consciousness is the second in a series of workshops held in connection with the University of Manchester’s Architecture of Consciousness project. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC), this project is directed by Prof. Tim Bayne and aims to develop a model of the structural features of consciousness.

 

Conf: Knowledge, Morality and Spirituality

International and Interdisciplinary Conference
 
Knowledge, Morality and Spirituality
 
Kolkata, INDIA
 
6-8 January 2016
 
 
Sponsored and Directed by
 
 
Call for Abstracts
 
Abstracts: 150 words
 
Deadline: 2 May 2015
 
Submit abstracts to the Conference Director,
Dr. Chandana Chakrabarti at chandanachak@gmail.com
also send a copy to iccsaexchange@gmail.com
 
Acceptance of proposal will be mailed within 2 weeks or earlier to participants
 
 
Subtopics:
 
Knowledge, Appearance and Reality, Knowing and Being, Justification of Knowledge, Knowledge and Existence, Realism and Idealism, Knowledge and Consciousness, Knowledge and Morality, Knowledge and Virtue, Virtue as Knowledge, Self and Morality, Collective Responsibility, Morality: Individual and Society, Death of God, God and Individual Self, Monism, Monotheism and Atheism, New Age Religions; Etc.
 
Subtopics are suggestive only. Conference organizers are open to other relevant topics addressing the theme.
 
 
 
Advisory Board Members:
 
Yolanda Espina (Portugal), Tommi Lehtonen (Finland), Asha Mukherjee (India), Debkumar Mukhopadhyya (India), Deven Patel (USA), Nina Petek (Slovenia), Ming Shao (China), Su Chen Wu (Taiwan), Yanling Xu (China)
 
Scholars from different corners of the world join our conferences.
 
The Cambridge Scholars Press has published seven books co-edited by members of our advisory board from selected papers from our last conferences. We also publish papers in our Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion if the theme of the paper is in the area of publication of the Journal.
 

Conf: Kentucky Philosophical Association

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Matthew Pianalto <matthew.pianalto@gmail.com>
Subject: CFA: Kentucky Philosophical Association Summer Workshop

 

Call for Abstracts: KPA Summer Workshop

Kentucky Philosophical Association (KPA)
Summer 2015 Workshop
July 23-24, 2015
Hosted at Centre College, Danville, KY

Submissions deadline May 15, 2015

The KPA invites the submission of abstracts for papers (4,000-7,000 words) on any topic in philosophy. We invite faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars to share in the opportunity to present and discuss their current work.

Abstracts should be 150 words or less. A draft of the accepted paper will be due by July 10, 2015 and distributed among the participants. Each participant will have 80 minutes for their work, which includes an overview of the paper and discussion.

Please email submissions to Eva Cadavid at eva.cadavid@centre.edu with the subject line “KPA 2015 workshop abstract”. Include in the email the following information:

1. Title of paper
2. 150-word abstract (attached as a pdf)
3. Author’s name
4. Author’s institutional affiliation (if applicable)
5. Author’s email address
6. Indication whether campus housing will be necessary

Note: Campus housing will be available at the cost of $20/night. Registration fee for the workshop is $50 and covers continental breakfast and boxed lunches for both days.

http://kentuckyphilosophy.blogspot.com/2015/02/call-for-abstracts-kpa-summer-workshop.html

***
Matt Pianalto
KPA Vice President
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Eastern Kentucky University

 

CfP: Value and Agency

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: EJ Coffman <ejcoffman@gmail.com>
Subject: Call for Abstracts // Tennessee Value & Agency Conference 2015: Knowledge & Agency
Call for Abstracts

Fourth Annual Tennessee Value and Agency (TVA) Conference

September 4-5, 2015 // The University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Theme: Knowledge and Agency

Keynote Speakers: Candace Vogler (David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Philosophy, University of Chicago) and John Schwenkler (Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Florida State University)

Abstracts (of 2-3 double-spaced pages, prepared for blind review) due by May 15, 2015 by e-mail to EJ Coffman (ecoffma1@utk.edu)

Much important and influential recent work in analytic philosophy lies at the intersection of epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of action and explores some or other of the following broad questions:

- Are action-theoretic concepts central to the nature of knowledge?
- What must you know in order to act (rationally, intentionally, freely, accountably)?
- How can you know about what you do (rationally, intentionally, freely, accountably)?

Abstracts that engage these and allied questions concerning the relationships among knowledge and agency will be considered for the 2015 TVA Conference. Sessions will be 75 minutes long, with roughly 40 minutes for the presentation and 35 minutes for group discussion.

We aim to notify authors of selected abstracts by June 1, 2015. If your abstract is selected and childcare duties render your attendance difficult, conference organizers will try to find a way for your childcare needs to be met.

The TVA conference (http://web.utk.edu/~philosop/TVA/conference.html) is an annual event aimed at encouraging philosophical conversation about topics pursued by established research clusters at the University of Tennessee Department of Philosophy.

 

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