Conf: Experimental Philosophy

James Beebe <beebejames@yahoo.com>

CFP: Buffalo Annual Experimental Philosophy Conference 2015

Submission deadline: Monday, June 1, 2015

Conference dates: Fri., Sept. 11 – Sat., Sept. 12, 2015

Conference Venue: Embassy Suites Buffalo, 200 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, New York, 14202, United States, 716-842-1000 (http://embassysuites3.hilton.com/en/hotels/new-york/embassy-suites-buffalo-BUFESES/index.html)

 

Keynote Speaker:

 

Thomas Nadelhoffer (College of Charleston, http://www.thomasnadelhoffer.com/)

Prof. Nadelhoffer’s main areas of research include free will, moral psychology, neuroethics, and punishment theory.

 

 

We invite submissions for paper or poster presentations on any topic pertaining to experimental philosophy. Submissions can report new experimental results or contribute to broader philosophical or methodological debates over existing or possible results. Both XPhi-friendly and XPhi-critical papers are welcomed. For paper submissions, we prefer to receive complete papers, but we will also accept extended abstracts. For poster submissions, please submit an extended abstract.

 

Participants who give paper presentations will be given 50 minute sessions within which to present their research and to respond to questions. Speakers are encouraged to allow at least 15 min. for Q&A. Speakers are also strongly encouraged to talk through their papers rather than read them verbatim. A poster session and hors d’oeuvres reception will take place on the evening of Fri., Sept. 11.

 

The conference registration fee will be $50 for faculty and $25 for graduate students and independent scholars.

 

Submissions should be sent via email to rkelly2@buffalo.edu no later than June 1, 2015. Organizers: Robert Kelly and James Beebe (Experimental Epistemology Research Group, University at Buffalo). The event is sponsored by the Peter Hare Memorial Fund and the Dept. of Philosophy at the University at Buffalo (SUNY).

http://eerg.buffalo.edu/

 

 

 

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

/ James R. Beebe, Ph.D.

/ Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy

/ Director, Experimental Epistemology Research Group

/ Member, Center for Cognitive Science

/ Web: http://www.buffalo.edu/~jbeebe2

/ Office: 106 Park Hall

/ State University of New York at Buffalo

/ Buffalo, NY 14260-4150

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Conf: Modal Metaphysics

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: SLOVAK METAPHYSICAL SOCIETY <slovakmetaphysics@gmail.com>
Subject: CFP: MODAL METAPHYSICS: ISSUES ON THE (IM)POSSIBLE III (Deadline: April 30, 2015)

 
MODAL METAPHYSICS: ISSUES ON THE (IM)POSSIBLE III

September 16-17, |)2015
(Bratislava, SLOVAKIA)

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

DANIEL NOLAN (Australian National University)

MARK JAGO (University of Nottingham)

We invite submissions for a 30 minute presentation followed by 10 minute comments and a 15 minute discussion. Areas of interest might include any aspect of analytic metaphysics of modality. A paper of approximately 3000 words should be prepared for blind review and include a cover page with the full name, title, institution and contact information (female philosophers are especially encouraged to submit a paper). Files can be submitted in pdf or doc(x) and should be sent to modalmetaphysics@gmail.com.

Deadline for submission: April 30, 2015
Notification of acceptance: June 30, 2015

The authors selected for the conference will be invited to contribute to a special issue of the journal of analytic philosophy Organon F. If you wish to submit a paper, or would need any further details, please, email us to the above address, contact Martin Vacek, or visit the conference website www.metaphysics.sk.

 

CfP: Humanities and Technology Review

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Erwin, Sean <SErwin@barry.edu>
Subject: Call for Papers, Humanities and Technology Review
CALL FOR PAPERS

Humanities and Technology Review

The Humanities and Technology Review is currently accepting papers of

4000-6000 word length for its 2015 issue This year’s specific theme is,

“Technology and Politics”, but papers addressing any area of technology

studies or the intersection of technology and some area in the humanities

are welcome.

 

For more information or to see previous issues of the HTR:

http://htronline.weebly.com/

 

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday, July 1st 2015. All submissions

must conform to APA, 6th edition guidelines. For details see, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

 

The HTR is an interdisciplinary, refereed journal published annually

in the Fall. All decisions on submissions are made by blind review.

 

Please address inquiries to:

 

Seán Erwin, PhD

Editor, Humanities and Technology Review

Assistant Professor Philosophy

Barry University

11415 NE 2nd Avenue

Barry University

Miami Shores, FL 33161

Serwin@barry.edu

 

CfP: Humanities and Technology Review

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Erwin, Sean <SErwin@barry.edu>
Subject: Call for Papers, Humanities and Technology Review
CALL FOR PAPERS

Humanities and Technology Review

The Humanities and Technology Review is currently accepting papers of

4000-6000 word length for its 2015 issue This year’s specific theme is,

“Technology and Politics”, but papers addressing any area of technology

studies or the intersection of technology and some area in the humanities

are welcome.

 

For more information or to see previous issues of the HTR:

http://htronline.weebly.com/

 

Deadline for submissions is Wednesday, July 1st 2015. All submissions

must conform to APA, 6th edition guidelines. For details see, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

 

The HTR is an interdisciplinary, refereed journal published annually

in the Fall. All decisions on submissions are made by blind review.

 

Please address inquiries to:

 

Seán Erwin, PhD

Editor, Humanities and Technology Review

Assistant Professor Philosophy

Barry University

11415 NE 2nd Avenue

Barry University

Miami Shores, FL 33161

Serwin@barry.edu

 

Conf: NW Philosophy

Please direct all replies to Ed Kaitz <eekaitz@nic.edu>
Call for Papers
 
Northwest Philosophy Conference
 
North Idaho College
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho
 
Friday and Saturday, October 9-10, 2015
Submission Guidelines
Papers on any philosophical topic are welcome.  Papers should be suitable for a 20-minute presentation (about 3000 words, not including material that will not be presented, such as abstract, bibliography, and any footnotes or endnotes).  Submissions should be formatted for blind review (only title at top of Page 1) and sent as Word or PDF documents to
Ed Kaitz <eekaitz@nic.edu>.
In the body of the email, please include paper title, 100- to 200-word abstract, author name, affiliation, status (graduate student or faculty), and contact information.  Within two business days, you will receive email confirmation that your paper has been submitted successfully.  Papers should be approximately 3,000 words (10-12 pages).
Submission deadline is August 1, 2015.
Final decisions will be made no later than August 30, 2015.
To facilitate and encourage discussion, paper sessions will have session chairs rather than commentators for individual papers.
Volunteers are needed to chair sessions; please e-mail if interested.
has more information.
 

Conf: Metaphors in Use

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Robin Dillon <rsd2@lehigh.edu>
Subject: CFA: Metaphors in Use, Lehigh University Oct. 8 & 9, 2015

 
Call for Abstracts

Metaphors in Use

Third Annual Lehigh University Conference in Philosophy, October 8 & 9, 2015

Keynote Speakers: Elizabeth Camp, Rutgers; Bryan Van Norden, Vassar; Lynne Tirrell, U Mass, Boston

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JUNE 30, 2015

Metaphors do heavy lifting in philosophical thinking. Many of us take it for granted that you can’t get something from nothing, time flows, good building projects require good foundations, music has movement, rafts can’t be built at sea, minds are like computers and cognition has architecture, etc. Cashing out metaphors can have interesting consequences for the positions they undergird, and important questions arise regarding how we are to understand arguments from metaphor.

We invite submissions that address issues relating to the roles metaphors play in philosophical argumentation, especially aspects of specific arguments from metaphor, evaluating their success, consequences, and power. We also seek submissions that address broader issues of the nature of metaphor and their place in philosophical work.

Electronic Submissions of detailed abstracts (750-1000 words) should be in Word or pdf format. Reading time for presented papers is 30 minutes.

Abstracts should be sent to <rlb314@lehigh.edu> with “LU conference submission” as subject. Please include in body of e-mail your name, paper title, institutional affiliation, and contact information.

Suggested topics include but aren’t exhausted by:

§ What does a particular argument from metaphor commit us to? Is the commitment one we ought to accept?
§ What happens when we unpack arguments that involve metaphor?
§ What is the role of metaphor in Philosopher X’s theory?
§ Does treating the idea that music has movement or that time flows as a metaphor affect how we theorize about musical expressiveness or time?
§ How do arguments from metaphor affect views on fundamentality?
§ What is metaphorical metaphysics? Can we do it?
§ Could the foundations of philosophy be entirely constructed without metaphor?
§ Should we take metaphors literally?
§ How can we respond to arguments from metaphor?
§ Is philosophy unique in its use of metaphor?
– Robin S. Dillon William Wilson Selfridge Professor of Philosophy Chair, Department of Philosophy Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA

 

Conf: Metaphors in Use

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Robin Dillon <rsd2@lehigh.edu>
Subject: CFA: Metaphors in Use, Lehigh University Oct. 8 & 9, 2015
Call for Abstracts

Metaphors in Use

Third Annual Lehigh University Conference in Philosophy, October 8 & 9, 2015

Keynote Speakers: Elizabeth Camp, Rutgers; Bryan Van Norden, Vassar; Lynne Tirrell, U Mass, Boston

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JUNE 30, 2015

Metaphors do heavy lifting in philosophical thinking. Many of us take it for granted that you can’t get something from nothing, time flows, good building projects require good foundations, music has movement, rafts can’t be built at sea, minds are like computers and cognition has architecture, etc. Cashing out metaphors can have interesting consequences for the positions they undergird, and important questions arise regarding how we are to understand arguments from metaphor.

We invite submissions that address issues relating to the roles metaphors play in philosophical argumentation, especially aspects of specific arguments from metaphor, evaluating their success, consequences, and power. We also seek submissions that address broader issues of the nature of metaphor and their place in philosophical work.

Electronic Submissions of detailed abstracts (750-1000 words) should be in Word or pdf format. Reading time for presented papers is 30 minutes.

Abstracts should be sent to <rlb314@lehigh.edu> with “LU conference submission” as subject. Please include in body of e-mail your name, paper title, institutional affiliation, and contact information.

Suggested topics include but aren’t exhausted by:

§ What does a particular argument from metaphor commit us to? Is the commitment one we ought to accept?
§ What happens when we unpack arguments that involve metaphor?
§ What is the role of metaphor in Philosopher X’s theory?
§ Does treating the idea that music has movement or that time flows as a metaphor affect how we theorize about musical expressiveness or time?
§ How do arguments from metaphor affect views on fundamentality?
§ What is metaphorical metaphysics? Can we do it?
§ Could the foundations of philosophy be entirely constructed without metaphor?
§ Should we take metaphors literally?
§ How can we respond to arguments from metaphor?
§ Is philosophy unique in its use of metaphor?
– Robin S. Dillon William Wilson Selfridge Professor of Philosophy Chair, Department of Philosophy Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA

 

 

Conf: Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: acscarfe2 <acscarfe2@gmail.com>
Subject: ​”​The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, 10th International Whitehead Conference, June 4-7th, 2015, Claremont, California, USA

 

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended
This is an invitation to Participate in “The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, Track 4 of Section IV: ‘Re-envisioning Nature; Re-envisioning Science’, at the 10th International Whitehead Conference, “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization”, June 4-7th, 2015, the Claremont Colleges, sponsored by the Center for Process Studies, Claremont, California, USA.

Darwin never explained to us what really transpired in his “Warm Little Pond,” which was the metaphor he gave in private correspondence symbolizing how life might have originated. Nor did Darwin provide any insight into the connection, if any, between his a-biogenetic hypothesis, and Natural Selection, which he held to be the efficient cause of organismic evolution.

Taking these Darwinian lacunae as our starting point and considering the hypothesis that organisms are selective agents in the evolutionary process, namely, “loci of valuative-selective activity” (Beyond Mechanism: Putting Life Back Into Biology, p. 264), rather than merely objects upon which Natural Selection acts, the focus of this consultation will be to explore how living agents emerged from so-called ‘inanimate nature’ and how they evolved.

Consultation proposals that overlap with the above themes, broadly construed, will be considered for inclusion in this track, especially those discussing the following topics and their connection to process-relational philosophy:

- systems chemistry and systems biology;

- kinetic selection and natural selection;

- natural selection and organic selection;

- biosemiotics;

- self-organization, homeostasis, thermodynamics, and symbiogenesis;

- auto-catalysis, auto-poeisis, and auto-genesis;

- teleology, teleonomy, and teleodynamics;

- materialism, mechanism, and organicism;

- reductionism, holism, and emergentism;

- genetics and epigenetics;

- Darwinism and Lamarckism;

- evolutionary neo-Kantianism;

- consciousness, feeling, and experience in the organic world;

- metabolism and psychosocial metabolism;

- the role of behavior in evolutionary processes;

- metaphysics and scientific inquiry;

- ecological and biological wisdom;

etc…

Note: the format of this track is a working group consultation. We shall be expected to share some of our research with one another as a group prior to the conference, such that our meeting will be maximally oriented toward creative exchange and collaborative initiative.

The final deadline to submit your 150-200 word consultation proposal for this track of the Conference has been extended to: April 4th, 2014, by 11:59pm, ET.

Please visit: www.Whitehead2015.com to register for the conference, AND submit your consultation proposal to Dr. Adam C. Scarfe (University of Winnipeg, Canada) at the following email address: a.scarfe@uwinnipeg.ca

 

Conf: Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: acscarfe2 <acscarfe2@gmail.com>
Subject: ​”​The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, 10th International Whitehead Conference, June 4-7th, 2015, Claremont, California, USA

 

Call for Papers – Deadline Extended
This is an invitation to Participate in “The Emergence and Evolution of Living Agents” Consultation, Track 4 of Section IV: ‘Re-envisioning Nature; Re-envisioning Science’, at the 10th International Whitehead Conference, “Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization”, June 4-7th, 2015, the Claremont Colleges, sponsored by the Center for Process Studies, Claremont, California, USA.

Darwin never explained to us what really transpired in his “Warm Little Pond,” which was the metaphor he gave in private correspondence symbolizing how life might have originated. Nor did Darwin provide any insight into the connection, if any, between his a-biogenetic hypothesis, and Natural Selection, which he held to be the efficient cause of organismic evolution.

Taking these Darwinian lacunae as our starting point and considering the hypothesis that organisms are selective agents in the evolutionary process, namely, “loci of valuative-selective activity” (Beyond Mechanism: Putting Life Back Into Biology, p. 264), rather than merely objects upon which Natural Selection acts, the focus of this consultation will be to explore how living agents emerged from so-called ‘inanimate nature’ and how they evolved.

Consultation proposals that overlap with the above themes, broadly construed, will be considered for inclusion in this track, especially those discussing the following topics and their connection to process-relational philosophy:

- systems chemistry and systems biology;

- kinetic selection and natural selection;

- natural selection and organic selection;

- biosemiotics;

- self-organization, homeostasis, thermodynamics, and symbiogenesis;

- auto-catalysis, auto-poeisis, and auto-genesis;

- teleology, teleonomy, and teleodynamics;

- materialism, mechanism, and organicism;

- reductionism, holism, and emergentism;

- genetics and epigenetics;

- Darwinism and Lamarckism;

- evolutionary neo-Kantianism;

- consciousness, feeling, and experience in the organic world;

- metabolism and psychosocial metabolism;

- the role of behavior in evolutionary processes;

- metaphysics and scientific inquiry;

- ecological and biological wisdom;

etc…

Note: the format of this track is a working group consultation. We shall be expected to share some of our research with one another as a group prior to the conference, such that our meeting will be maximally oriented toward creative exchange and collaborative initiative.

The final deadline to submit your 150-200 word consultation proposal for this track of the Conference has been extended to: April 4th, 2014, by 11:59pm, ET.

Please visit: www.Whitehead2015.com to register for the conference, AND submit your consultation proposal to Dr. Adam C. Scarfe (University of Winnipeg, Canada) at the following email address: a.scarfe@uwinnipeg.ca

 

Conf: Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Anjan Chakravartty <chakravartty.1@nd.edu>
Subject: CFP: The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

 

The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research

5-6 November 2015, University of Notre Dame

Notre Dame’s John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values invites you to a conference on The Collaboration Conundrum: Special Interests and Scientific Research.

Plenary
Peter Kareiva is Chief Scientist at the Nature Conservancy, a non-profit organization that collaborates with industry. He has held positions in academia for 20 years and in government with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Call for abstracts
Historical scandals involving industry-funded research, together with empirical evidence of correlations in some areas of science between industry funding and research results favorable to industry have undermined trust in industry-funded science. And yet, it is unrealistic and wasteful to dismiss industry-funded research across the board as unreliable and unconcerned with the public good. What to do? Government reports and scholarly publications are currently extolling the value of public participation in scientific research, and a number of funding agencies are now encouraging initiatives such as community-based participatory research (CBPR). Could the participation of citizen groups in industry-funded research also prove valuable—to increase the relevance, reliability, and acceptability of industry research?

Papers are invited from scholars working in any area relevant to the conference topic, including philosophy, history, the private sector, government, non-profit organizations, the sciences, and other areas of the humanities. Sample topics include (but are not limited to):

- Philosophical and historical perspectives on collaborative research
- Case studies of collaborative scientific research
- Public perceptions of scientific research produced in a collaborative manner
- Legal guidelines and regulations for handling research collaborations
- Ethical principles for managing research collaborations
- Empirical research on the results of research collaborations
- Barriers and opportunities associated with collaborative research

This conference is one in a series of events organized in association with the consortium for Socially Relevant Philosophy of/in Science and Engineering (SRPoiSE), of which the Reilly Center is a member. More information about SRPoiSE is available at http://srpoise.org/.

Abstract Submission
The abstract submission deadline is Monday, June 1, 2015. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words. Abstracts will be refereed and results communicated to authors by June 30, 2015.

Abstract submission is electronic at: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=c3. If you do not have an EasyChair account, you can create one. After logging in, click the ‘New Submission’ link. Add your abstract to the field provided. You can revise your submission any number of times before the deadline.

Registration, travel, accommodations, further information
The Collaboration Conundrum Conference will be held at Notre Dame’s Conference Center. A block of rooms is being held at Morris Inn of Notre Dame, please mention the Collaboration Conundrum Conference when making hotel reservations with the Morris Inn (morrisinn.nd.edu or 800-280-7256).

All conference-related information will be posted on the Reilly Center’s website at reilly.nd.edu. Further inquiries may be addressed to Tori Davies at tdavies@nd.edu and 574-631-5015.

Program Committee
Anjan Chakravartty, University of Notre Dame
Kevin Elliott, Michigan State University
Janet Kourany, University of Notre Dame

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