Conf: Quantum Computation, Quantum Information, and the Exact Sciences

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Michael Cuffaro <mike@michaelcuffaro.com>
Subject: Call for Abstracts: Quantum Computation, Quantum Information, and the Exact Sciences

 

Call for Abstracts: Quantum Computation, Quantum Information, and the Exact Sciences
We invite submissions from both philosophers and scientists exploring the connections between the philosophy and foundations of quantum computation and quantum information theory (QCIT), and more traditional philosophical and foundational questions in physics, computer science, information theory, and mathematics. Envisioned topics for contributed papers include: QCIT’s relevance for our understanding of the structure and axiomatics of quantum theory, QCIT’s relevance for our understanding of physical conceptions of computation and/or information, alternative formalisms and mathematical frameworks for characterising QCIT, methodological differences and commonalities between QCIT and more traditional approaches to the exact sciences, and the metaphysical significance (or lack thereof) of the concepts and operational definitions of QCIT. This list is not exhaustive.

Dates of the conference: January 30-31, 2015.

Location: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany.

Keynote speakers
==
Hans J. Briegel, University of Innsbruck, Austria and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria.

Leah Henderson, Center for Formal Epistemology, Carnegie Mellon University, United States of America.

Christopher Timpson, Brasenose College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

Organizers: Michael Cuffaro (Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy), Samuel Fletcher (Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy), Johannes Kofler (Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics).

Submissions
==
Submissions, consisting of one short (max. 100 word) and one extended (750-1000 word) abstract, will be double-blind reviewed and should be submitted through our automated submission system (EasyChair): https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=qcompinfo2015

Please prepare your submission for blind review by removing any identifying information from both your short and long abstract. Your short abstract should be pasted directly into the text box provided on the submission form. Your long abstract should be saved as a PDF document and uploaded via the “Upload a Paper” interface on the submission form. Do not tick the “Abstract Only” check box.

Note: you will be able to revise your submission any number of times before the submission deadline.

Submission deadline: November 14, 2014 at 11:55PM (GMT).

Notification date: December 2, 2014.

Registration fee (includes the price of the conference dinner): 50€ regular fee, 30€ for graduate students.

The conference language is English.

Website where more information on the conference will be posted soon:

http://www.mcmp.philosophie.uni-muenchen.de/events/workshops/index.html

 

Conf: Logic and Information

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Patrick Allo <patrick.allo@vub.ac.be>
Subject: CFP: Workshop on Logic and Information (Istanbul, 25-30 Jun, 2015)

 
Workshop at the Fifth World Conference on Universal Logic
25-30 June 2015
University of Istanbul

Description
The juxtaposition of ‘logic’ and ‘information’ is popular as well as controversial: It is clear that there must be a connection between both, but there is hardly any agreement about the precise nature of the connection. When we focus on how information can clarify what logic is about, it is natural to say that valid arguments are just those arguments where the content of the conclusion does not exceed the combined content of the premises. Yet, such explanations do not have the same status as more entrenched truth-conditional and inferential conceptions of logical consequence, which suggests that information-talk about logic is simply redundant. When, by contrast, we focus on how logic can clarify the nature and dynamics of information, we turn our attention to specific developments in philosophical logic, like logics of knowledge and belief and their many dynamic extensions. While this opens up an entirely new field of formal investigations — often dubbed the dynamic and interactive turn in logic — it is less clear whether such developments establish a special connection between logic and information (after all, there are plenty of logics of X whose existence and usefulness does not imply a special connection between logic and what it is used for).

At least since Carnap and Bar-Hillel’s theory of semantic information, many closer connections between logic and information have been developed by, amongst others, Barwise & Perry, Corcoran, and Hintikka. More recently, the simultaneous rise of the philosophy of information and the dynamic and interactive turn in logic has led to a revival of the question of how information and logic can be related. In this workshop we want to approach the subject from the perspective of the philosophy of information, as well as from a logical perspective, and draw attention to a number of questions that have received more attention, or have only been individuated in recent years. These include the possibility of a genuine informational conception of logical consequence, the relation between informational and computational approaches, the relation between information and logics of questions, and the difference between (what van Benthem calls) implicit informational stances in logic like that of intuitionist logic and explicit stances like that of epistemic logic.

Keynote speaker
Luciano Floridi (OII, Oxford University)

Call for abstracts
Extended abstracts (1000-1500 words) should be sent via e-mail before November 15th 2014 to: workshop@logicandinformation.be

Organisers
The workshop is hosted by Universal Logic 2015 and organised in collaboration with the Society for the Philosophy of Information.
Workshop chairs are: Patrick Allo and Giuseppe Primiero.

 

Conf: Wittgenstein’s 1930-1933 Cambridge Lectures

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: David Stern <david-stern@uiowa.edu>
Subject: CFA: Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933

 
Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: text and context
Call for Abstracts: Special Opportunity for One Early Career Scholar
Deadline: October 27 by 5:pm

Location: Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, Iowa City, Iowa
Dates: May 18-22, 2015
Faculty Director: Professor David Stern, Department of Philosophy, University of Iowa

Beginning in January 1930, Ludwig Wittgenstein regularly gave lecture courses at Cambridge. GE Moore attended almost all of those lectures for the next three and a half years and took very full notes. This period was a time of transition for Wittgenstein, and is of great interest for anyone who wants to understand the development of his thought. Wittgenstein’s teaching and writing from the 1930s, once overshadowed by his earlier and later work, has attracted growing attention in recent years.
In the fall of 2015, Cambridge University Press will publish Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933, From the Notes of G. E Moore, edited by David Stern, Brian Rogers, and Gabriel Citron. This is the first edition of notes from any of Wittgenstein’s lectures that aims to present, as accurately as possible, what was written down at the time. While Moore did occasionally quote from his notes in his published essay on the lectures, Moore’s essay was primarily an analysis of the views he attributed to Wittgenstein. Moore’s succinct but detailed lecture notes are always considerably longer than the previously published student versions, and often include whole topics that are simply missing from theirs. Seminar presenters and participants will have advance access to the text of the forthcoming edition of Moore’s lecture notes.
Early career scholars (defined as those who, as of September 1, are within fifteen years of receiving a PhD) are invited to apply to present a paper. One person will be selected, on the basis of an abstract (250-500 words) and a copy of a current cv, which should be submitted as a single PDF attachment to an email addressed to to erin-hackathorn@uiowa.edu by October 27, 2014. A decision will be announced by November 21.
The paper proposed in the abstract should address some aspect of Wittgenstein’s 1930- 33 lectures. A detailed description of those lectures can be found in Moore’s ‘Wittgenstein’s Lectures in 1930-33,’ first published in three parts in Mind in 1954-55, and reprinted in Wittgenstein, Philosophical Occasions. Students’ notes from those lectures have been published in Wittgenstein’s Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1932, ed. Desmond Lee and the first part of Wittgenstein’s Lectures, Cambridge 1932-1935, ed. Alice Ambrose. Further information about the lectures and the forthcoming edition can be found in Stern, Citron and Rogers “Moore’s notes on Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: Text, Context, and Content.” Nordic Wittgenstein Review #2 2013, pp. 161-179, available by open access online from http://www.nordicwittgensteinreview.com/
The early career scholar who is selected to present a paper at the symposium will be given immediate access to the full text of the forthcoming edition of Moore’s lecture notes, and will be expected to submit a completed paper by April 1, 2015. The selected participant’s travel expenses and accommodation during the symposium will be fully covered.

A full list of invited participants and further information about the symposium are available at

http://obermann.uiowa.edu/programs/summer-seminar/summer-2015-wittgensteins-lectures-cambridge-1930-1933

 

Conf: Epistemic Reasons

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Yves Bouchard <Yves.Bouchard@usherbrooke.ca>
Subject: 2nd CFA: CSE 2014 Epistemic Reasons

 

SECOND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

* EPISTEMIC REASONS *

International Symposium
November 7-8, 2014
University of Sherbrooke
Quebec, Canada

Organized by the
Canadian Society for Epistemology

Deadline: Monday September 29th

Epistemic reasons ground belief: in a factual sense they are actual grounds for belief, and in a normative sense they are good grounds for belief. This year’s symposium will be devoted to exploring the concept of epistemic reasons, whether factual or normative. Specific topics of presentation may include the relevance of practical interests and affective states to epistemic reasons, psychologism about epistemic reasons and its competitors, epistemic reasons in foundationalist, coherentist, and externalist frameworks, a priori epistemic reasons, epistemic reasons and testimonial knowledge, and the role of epistemic reasons in automatic vs. deliberative cognitive processes.

The languages of the symposium are English and French.

Authors are invited to submit a 250 word abstract (in English or in French) for a paper of 20-30 minutes reading time. The deadline for submitting an abstract is Monday September 29th. Abstracts can be submitted online.

For more information, visit the Symposium’s website at

http://sce-cse.recherche.usherbrooke.ca

or write to

Yves Bouchard
yves.bouchard@usherbrooke.ca

David Matheson
david_matheson@carleton.ca

Yves Bouchard
Department of Philosophy and Applied Ethics
University of Sherbrooke
2500, boulevard de l’Université
Sherbrooke (Québec) J1K 2R1 Canada
Phone 819-821-8000

 

Conf: Logic And Philosophy Of Mathematical Practices

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Patrick Allo <patrick.allo@vub.ac.be>
Subject: CfP: Logic And Philosophy Of Mathematical Practices

 
Call for papers

LOGIC and PHILOSOPHY of MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES
Strategic Research Project – CLWF Free University Brussels VUB

Brussels 11-12 December, 2014

The Center for Logic and Philosophy of Science (CLWF) at Free University Brussels (VUB) welcomes abstracts for an international workshop on LOGIC and PHILOSOPHY of MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES.

Invited keynote speakers are:
Danielle Macbeth (Haverford College, Haverford, PA)
Rik Pinxten (Ghent University)
Suzanne Prediger (Technische Universität Dortmund)

The conference will be held at Métropole Hotel, Place De Brouckèreplein 31, 1000 Brussels, at the historical centre of Brussels http://www.metropolehotel.com/

We welcome paper proposals on a variety of topics related to the conference theme ‘on mathematical practices’ , including (but not limited to) contributions to:
logic and argumentation
philosophy of mathematics
mathematics and culture
arts, philosophy, and science
STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics)
etc.

Scientific committee:
Patrick Allo (Free University Brussels)
Kathleen Coessens (Free University Brussels)
Karen François (Free University Brussels)
Danielle Macbeth (Haverford College, Haverford, PA)
Rik Pinxten (Ghent University)
Suzanne Prediger (Technische Universität Dortmund)
Jean Paul Van Bendegem (Free University Brussels)
Bart Van Kerkhove (Free University Brussels)

Local Organizing Committee: Center of Logic and Philosophy of Science – Free University Brussels (Vrije Universiteit Brussel): Patrick Allo, Karen François, Joachim Frans, Yacin Hamami, Jean Paul Van Bendegem, Bart Van Kerkhove

Please send abstracts (max. 500 words) prepared for blind review to Patrick Allo <patrick.allo[ad]vub.ac.be> by November 1, 2014. Please include identifying information on separate page or accompanying email.

Important Dates:
Abstract Submission: 1 November 2014
Notification : 7 November 2014
Early Registration: 30 November 2014. Registration fee 100 Euro (all included: coffee breaks, lunch, conference materials, booklet) From December 1st registration fee will be 200 euro
Conference: 11-12 December 2014
Information and registration: Conference page: http://www.vub.ac.be/CLWF/LPMP2014/

 

Conf: Logic And Philosophy Of Mathematical Practices

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Patrick Allo <patrick.allo@vub.ac.be>
Subject: CfP: Logic And Philosophy Of Mathematical Practices

Call for papers

LOGIC and PHILOSOPHY of MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES
Strategic Research Project – CLWF Free University Brussels VUB

Brussels 11-12 December, 2014

The Center for Logic and Philosophy of Science (CLWF) at Free University Brussels (VUB) welcomes abstracts for an international workshop on LOGIC and PHILOSOPHY of MATHEMATICAL PRACTICES.

Invited keynote speakers are:
Danielle Macbeth (Haverford College, Haverford, PA)
Rik Pinxten (Ghent University)
Suzanne Prediger (Technische Universität Dortmund)

The conference will be held at Métropole Hotel, Place De Brouckèreplein 31, 1000 Brussels, at the historical centre of Brussels http://www.metropolehotel.com/

We welcome paper proposals on a variety of topics related to the conference theme ‘on mathematical practices’ , including (but not limited to) contributions to:
logic and argumentation
philosophy of mathematics
mathematics and culture
arts, philosophy, and science
STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics)
etc.

Scientific committee:
Patrick Allo (Free University Brussels)
Kathleen Coessens (Free University Brussels)
Karen François (Free University Brussels)
Danielle Macbeth (Haverford College, Haverford, PA)
Rik Pinxten (Ghent University)
Suzanne Prediger (Technische Universität Dortmund)
Jean Paul Van Bendegem (Free University Brussels)
Bart Van Kerkhove (Free University Brussels)

Local Organizing Committee: Center of Logic and Philosophy of Science – Free University Brussels (Vrije Universiteit Brussel): Patrick Allo, Karen François, Joachim Frans, Yacin Hamami, Jean Paul Van Bendegem, Bart Van Kerkhove

Please send abstracts (max. 500 words) prepared for blind review to Patrick Allo <patrick.allo[ad]vub.ac.be> by November 1, 2014. Please include identifying information on separate page or accompanying email.

Important Dates:
Abstract Submission: 1 November 2014
Notification : 7 November 2014
Early Registration: 30 November 2014. Registration fee 100 Euro (all included: coffee breaks, lunch, conference materials, booklet) From December 1st registration fee will be 200 euro
Conference: 11-12 December 2014
Information and registration: Conference page: http://www.vub.ac.be/CLWF/LPMP2014/

Conf: Hume, Religion, Morality

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kroeker Esther <esther.kroeker@uantwerpen.be>
Subject: Hume, Religion, Morality, Antwerp

Religion and Morality: Hume and his Context

International Conference

May 28 – 29, 2015

University of Antwerp, Philosophy Department, Center for Ethics

Keynote speakers:

Michael B. Gill (University of Arizona)

Gordon Graham (Princeton Theological Seminary)

Thomas Holden (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Jennifer Marusic (Brandeis University/Humboldt University, Berlin)

Call for Papers

We welcome papers dealing with the topic of the conference, Religion and Morality: Hume and his Context.

The conference seeks to offer the opportunity to discuss Hume’s understanding of morality and of religion, as well as their relation. We also welcome papers discussing the relation between Hume and his predecessors or contemporaries on issues pertaining to morality and religion.

The central focus of the conference will be Hume’s practical critique of religion (i.e. his scattered but recurrent remarks on the detrimental influence of religion on moral character and agency) together with his understanding of religion as a natural phenomenon that may play an important role in fostering human virtues. How does Hume’s moral critique of religion square with his observations that morality and religion are closely interwoven? Hume seems to be convinced that the masses will never be able to live without some form of religion. How does this fit with his defense of a secularized ethics?

We also seek to address the views of Hume’s contemporaries that directly challenge or enforce Hume’s understanding of morality and religion.

Other possible topics include the context in which Hume develops his account; contemporary accounts that are related to Hume on morality, religion, and, for instance, cognitive science or experimental psychology; the naturalness of religion and its impact on the moral or political life; and true religion and passions in Hume. We also welcome papers dealing with question such as: why and how is Hume’s morality secular? Does Hume’s account of the virtues and vices undermine or discredit religious morality or the teaching of Christianity?  Is the autonomy thesis (morality autonomous from religion) in conflict with theism and with religion? Etc.

 

Deadline for submission: January 8th, 2015.

Please send abstracts of maximum 500 words to

Esther Kroeker (esther.kroeker@uantwerpen.be)

 

University of Antwerp

Philosophy Department, Center for Ethics

Grote Kauwenberg 18

2000 Antwerp

Belgium

 

Conf: Wittgenstein’s 1930-1933 Cambridge Lectures

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: David Stern <david-stern@uiowa.edu>
Subject: CFA: Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933

Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: text and context
Call for Abstracts: Special Opportunity for One Early Career Scholar
Deadline: October 27 by 5:pm

Location: Obermann Center for Advanced Studies, Iowa City, Iowa
Dates: May 18-22, 2015
Faculty Director: Professor David Stern, Department of Philosophy, University of Iowa

Beginning in January 1930, Ludwig Wittgenstein regularly gave lecture courses at Cambridge. GE Moore attended almost all of those lectures for the next three and a half years and took very full notes. This period was a time of transition for Wittgenstein, and is of great interest for anyone who wants to understand the development of his thought. Wittgenstein’s teaching and writing from the 1930s, once overshadowed by his earlier and later work, has attracted growing attention in recent years.
In the fall of 2015, Cambridge University Press will publish Wittgenstein: Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933, From the Notes of G. E Moore, edited by David Stern, Brian Rogers, and Gabriel Citron. This is the first edition of notes from any of Wittgenstein’s lectures that aims to present, as accurately as possible, what was written down at the time. While Moore did occasionally quote from his notes in his published essay on the lectures, Moore’s essay was primarily an analysis of the views he attributed to Wittgenstein. Moore’s succinct but detailed lecture notes are always considerably longer than the previously published student versions, and often include whole topics that are simply missing from theirs. Seminar presenters and participants will have advance access to the text of the forthcoming edition of Moore’s lecture notes.
Early career scholars (defined as those who, as of September 1, are within fifteen years of receiving a PhD) are invited to apply to present a paper. One person will be selected, on the basis of an abstract (250-500 words) and a copy of a current cv, which should be submitted as a single PDF attachment to an email addressed to to erin-hackathorn@uiowa.edu by October 27, 2014. A decision will be announced by November 21.
The paper proposed in the abstract should address some aspect of Wittgenstein’s 1930- 33 lectures. A detailed description of those lectures can be found in Moore’s ‘Wittgenstein’s Lectures in 1930-33,’ first published in three parts in Mind in 1954-55, and reprinted in Wittgenstein, Philosophical Occasions. Students’ notes from those lectures have been published in Wittgenstein’s Lectures, Cambridge 1930-1932, ed. Desmond Lee and the first part of Wittgenstein’s Lectures, Cambridge 1932-1935, ed. Alice Ambrose. Further information about the lectures and the forthcoming edition can be found in Stern, Citron and Rogers “Moore’s notes on Wittgenstein’s lectures, Cambridge 1930-1933: Text, Context, and Content.” Nordic Wittgenstein Review #2 2013, pp. 161-179, available by open access online from http://www.nordicwittgensteinreview.com/
The early career scholar who is selected to present a paper at the symposium will be given immediate access to the full text of the forthcoming edition of Moore’s lecture notes, and will be expected to submit a completed paper by April 1, 2015. The selected participant’s travel expenses and accommodation during the symposium will be fully covered.

A full list of invited participants and further information about the symposium are available at
http://obermann.uiowa.edu/programs/summer-seminar/summer-2015-wittgensteins-lectures-cambridge-1930-1933

Conf: Moral Responsibility

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Justen Olsen <jmolsen1967@gmail.com>
Subject: Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility

 

 

Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

March 27, 2015

Utah Valley University

Orem, Utah

 

Moral responsibility has consistently been a salient issue in disciplines such as the law, psychology, psychiatry, and philosophy. The questions about social, cognitive, and psychological constraints on legal and moral responsibility are ever-evolving with advances in technology and knowledge. This conference seeks to address cutting-edge applied issues in moral and legal responsibility.

 

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Invited: Teneille Brown, William Hirstein, David Polizzi, Adina Roskies, Katrina Sifferd, Chandra Sripada, Nicole Vincent

 

We invite papers that fall under two broad themes.

 

1. Understanding moral responsibility based on changes in what we know: Examples of questions under this theme include, but are not limited to the following: What are the legal implications of fMRIs in the courtroom? Can neuroscience aid the courtroom in assessing moral responsibility? Do advances in understanding how the mind/brain works change our moral responsibility practices? How do practitioners’ underlying assumptions about moral responsibility inform their disciplinary practices?

 

2. Understanding moral responsibility in applied contexts:  Examples of questions under this theme include, but are not limited to the following:  Do personality disorders, schizophrenia, dementia, or attention-deficit disorder affect moral or legal responsibility? What are the implications for how we draw the distinction between addiction and compulsion? Between weakness of will and compulsion? Are we morally responsible for implicit biases? Are we legally and/or morally responsible for unconscious thought processes?

 

To submit, please send a 1000-1200 word abstract prepared for blind review to the gmail account: MRConf2015. The deadline is October 1, 2014.

Conf: Moral Responsibility

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Justen Olsen <jmolsen1967@gmail.com>
Subject: Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility

 

 

Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

March 27, 2015

Utah Valley University

Orem, Utah

 

Moral responsibility has consistently been a salient issue in disciplines such as the law, psychology, psychiatry, and philosophy. The questions about social, cognitive, and psychological constraints on legal and moral responsibility are ever-evolving with advances in technology and knowledge. This conference seeks to address cutting-edge applied issues in moral and legal responsibility.

 

Confirmed speakers:

Keynote: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Invited: Teneille Brown, William Hirstein, David Polizzi, Adina Roskies, Katrina Sifferd, Chandra Sripada, Nicole Vincent

 

We invite papers that fall under two broad themes.

 

1. Understanding moral responsibility based on changes in what we know: Examples of questions under this theme include, but are not limited to the following: What are the legal implications of fMRIs in the courtroom? Can neuroscience aid the courtroom in assessing moral responsibility? Do advances in understanding how the mind/brain works change our moral responsibility practices? How do practitioners’ underlying assumptions about moral responsibility inform their disciplinary practices?

 

2. Understanding moral responsibility in applied contexts:  Examples of questions under this theme include, but are not limited to the following:  Do personality disorders, schizophrenia, dementia, or attention-deficit disorder affect moral or legal responsibility? What are the implications for how we draw the distinction between addiction and compulsion? Between weakness of will and compulsion? Are we morally responsible for implicit biases? Are we legally and/or morally responsible for unconscious thought processes?

 

To submit, please send a 1000-1200 word abstract prepared for blind review to the gmail account: MRConf2015. The deadline is October 1, 2014.

 

 

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