Conf: Metaphysics

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Rome Metaphysics <romemetaphysics@gmail.com>
Subject: Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics, Nov. 12-14, 2015

 

The Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics will be held this year in Salamanca, Spain, November 12-14. After five previous events held every three years in Rome since 2000, we are being hosted on this occasion by the Pontifical University of Salamanca, which has joined forces with the Idente Foundation for Study and Research in Italy and the Fernando Rielo Foundation in Spain, for the organization of the Conference. The Fernando Rielo Chair has also been created at the Pontifical University.
This singular forum has brought together hundreds of people from all over the world and from many different academic and professional backgrounds in pursuit of a clearer vision of how our conceptions of ultimate reality shape and interact with the varied spheres of human thought and creativity. The exchanges which have taken place have helped us to open our understanding not only to the absolute horizon of life, but to the interconnectedness of our endeavors, ranging from epistemology to medicine.
A key concern this year is the vocation of metaphysical and humanistic thought in general to shed light on and provide responses to the concrete personal, religious, and cultural needs of human beings.
2015 is the Jubilee Year of St. Theresa of Avila, and the mystical dimension of thought and experience, which has always received attention at previous Conferences, should prove even more significant now. A concluding event in Avila, with the collaboration of the local university, has also been introduced into Metaphysics 2015.
As in previous years, the Conference is envisioned as multidisciplinary, open to all the major fields of human reflection and activity. For the sake of simplicity, this openness has been summarized under five headings:
a) metaphysics and the mystical dimension;
b) metaphysics and knowledge;
c) metaphysics and aesthetics (art, literature, music);
d) metaphysics and experiential sciences (including medicine, psychotherapy, law, economics, political science);
e) metaphysics and experimental and formal sciences.
The two official languages of the Conference this year are English and Spanish.
Please visit the Conference website for detailed information and instructions on registration, the submission of topics and abstracts, and travel to Salamanca:
www.romemetaphysics.org
Feel free to write us at any time with questions relating to any aspect of the Conference, be it content, practical organization, or proposals for papers and discussion, and we shall reply as promptly as possible:
info@romemetaphysics.org
David G. Murray

Director
Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics
Salamanca, Spain — November 12-14, 2015
dgmurray@gmail.com

www.romemetaphysics.org
info@romemetaphysics.org
Fondazione Idente di Studi e di Ricerca

Via dei Giubbonari, 64

00184 Roma (RM)

Italia

Tel/Fax: +39 06 68139624
Email: fiser@idente.net

 

Conf: Medieval Studies

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Alexander Hall <AlexanderHall@clayton.edu>
Subject: CFP Medieval Logic and Metaphysics

 

Call for papers

Venue: 2016 International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University
Dates: May 12-15, 2016
Sponsor: Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics http://faculty.fordham.edu/klima/SMLM.htm
Contact: Submit proposals to Alex Hall at alexanderhall@clayton.edu by September 15, 2015

The Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics invites abstracts for presentations at our sponsored session at the 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies. Sessions run 90 minutes, with three 20 minute talks. Pending the approval of our publisher, papers from this and other 2016 Society sponsored sessions will make up vol. 15 of our proceedings, planned for release in the 2017-2018 academic year: http://www.cambridgescholars.com/proceedings-of-the-society-for-medieval-logic-and-metaphysics-4.

Session
Hylomorphism and Mereology
Mereology is the metaphysical theory of parts and wholes, including their conditions of identity and persistence through change. Hylomorphism is the Aristotelian metaphysical doctrine according to which all natural substances, including living organisms, consist of matter and form as their essential parts, where the substantial form of living organisms is identified as their soul. Consequently, medieval philosophers’ discussions of these topics cover a broad philosophical terrain, taking in the problem of material constitution, biological organization and the principle of life, human nature, and even the fate of the soul after death. Specifically, medieval thought on these issues is of broader interest to contemporary philosophers, given that medieval theories are now offered as viable alternatives to various modern understandings of the related problems.

Conf: Metaphysics

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Rome Metaphysics <romemetaphysics@gmail.com>
Subject: Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics, Nov. 12-14, 2015

 
The Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics will be held this year in Salamanca, Spain, November 12-14. After five previous events held every three years in Rome since 2000, we are being hosted on this occasion by the Pontifical University of Salamanca, which has joined forces with the Idente Foundation for Study and Research in Italy and the Fernando Rielo Foundation in Spain, for the organization of the Conference. The Fernando Rielo Chair has also been created at the Pontifical University.
This singular forum has brought together hundreds of people from all over the world and from many different academic and professional backgrounds in pursuit of a clearer vision of how our conceptions of ultimate reality shape and interact with the varied spheres of human thought and creativity. The exchanges which have taken place have helped us to open our understanding not only to the absolute horizon of life, but to the interconnectedness of our endeavors, ranging from epistemology to medicine.
A key concern this year is the vocation of metaphysical and humanistic thought in general to shed light on and provide responses to the concrete personal, religious, and cultural needs of human beings.
2015 is the Jubilee Year of St. Theresa of Avila, and the mystical dimension of thought and experience, which has always received attention at previous Conferences, should prove even more significant now. A concluding event in Avila, with the collaboration of the local university, has also been introduced into Metaphysics 2015.
As in previous years, the Conference is envisioned as multidisciplinary, open to all the major fields of human reflection and activity. For the sake of simplicity, this openness has been summarized under five headings:
a) metaphysics and the mystical dimension;
b) metaphysics and knowledge;
c) metaphysics and aesthetics (art, literature, music);
d) metaphysics and experiential sciences (including medicine, psychotherapy, law, economics, political science);
e) metaphysics and experimental and formal sciences.
The two official languages of the Conference this year are English and Spanish.
Please visit the Conference website for detailed information and instructions on registration, the submission of topics and abstracts, and travel to Salamanca:
www.romemetaphysics.org
Feel free to write us at any time with questions relating to any aspect of the Conference, be it content, practical organization, or proposals for papers and discussion, and we shall reply as promptly as possible:
info@romemetaphysics.org
David G. Murray

Director
Sixth World Conference on Metaphysics
Salamanca, Spain — November 12-14, 2015
dgmurray@gmail.com

www.romemetaphysics.org
info@romemetaphysics.org
Fondazione Idente di Studi e di Ricerca

Via dei Giubbonari, 64

00184 Roma (RM)

Italia

Tel/Fax: +39 06 68139624
Email: fiser@idente.net

 

Conf: Philosophical Issues in Scientific Psychiatry

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Christian Perring <cperring@yahoo.com>
Subject: Call for Abstracts, AAPP 28th Annual Meeting, May 14-15, 2016

 

Call for Abstracts, AAPP 28th Annual Meeting, May 14-15, 2016 Atlanta, GA
Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry

28th ANNUAL MEETING May 14-15, 2016 Atlanta, GA

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES IN SCIENTIFIC PSYCHIATRY:
RDOC, DSM, MECHANISMS, AND MORE

Conference co-chairs: Şerife Tekin & Peter Zachar

Keynote speakers:

Scott O. Lilienfeld, Ph.D. Emory University

Uma Vaidyanathan, Ph.D. National Institute of Mental Health, RDoC Unit

The science of psychiatry advances by means of empirical research. Scientific cultures, however, rely upon on non-empirical commitments such as methodological preferences, criteria for good constructs, and decisions about how to allocate limited resources to a superfluity of scientific goals. For instance shortly before the publication of the DSM-5 ̧the National Institute of Mental Health announced the goal of ultimately replacing the DSM as a guide for scientific research in psychiatry. Their preferred alternative is called the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), a classification matrix of basic psychological capacities that lend themselves for explanation by relevant biological mechanisms. In some respects RDoC is as much a philosophical revolution as a scientific one.

Accompanying this transition is the burgeoning body of first person accounts of patients, narrating the experience of mental disorder and psychiatric treatment, adding to the sources of knowledge in psychiatry.

Both these transitions in the psychiatric landscape create further impetus to revisit important topics pertaining to scientific research in psychopathology, not only among psychiatrists and psychologists, but also among philosophers and historians of science who specialize in thinking about the nature of scientific research and progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the RDoC framework for psychiatric research?
 How could recent philosophical work on mechanisms contribute to RDoC’s promise to develop a causal understanding of psychopathology?
Should latent variables be considered causes of behavior?
 To what does construct validity refer in a psychiatric context?
Categories of mental disorder may not carve nature at the joints. Do competing dimensional models?
 Can research in the history and theory of psychopathology contribute to the progress of scientific psychiatry? How can the work on values in feminist philosophy of science address the various tensions that exist between scientist versus practitioner perspectives?
 What are the implications of the differences between folk psychological and scientific psychological concepts on scientific research on mental disorders?
 Can patients’ experiences with mental illness contribute to scientific progress, or are they incommensurable?

Presentations will be strictly limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for discussion.

Abstracts will be blind reviewed, so the author’s identifying information should be attached separately.

Abstracts should be 500-600 words and sent via email by November 15, 2015 to Şerife Tekin (stekin@daemen.edu) and Peter Zachar (pzachar@aum.edu). Notices of acceptance or rejection will be distributed in January.

http://philosophyandpsychiatry.org/2015/07/09/call-for-abstracts-aapp-28th-annual-meeting-may-14-15-2016-atlanta-ga/

 

 
Christian Perring, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Dowling College

http://christianperring.com/

Editor of Metapsychology Online Reviews: http://metapsychology.mentalhelp.net/
Office Phone: (631) 244-3349
Dept Philosophy, Dowling College, 150 Idle Hour Blvd, Oakdale, NY 11769, USA

 

Conf: Philosophical Issues in Scientific Psychiatry

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Christian Perring <cperring@yahoo.com>
Subject: Call for Abstracts, AAPP 28th Annual Meeting, May 14-15, 2016

 

Call for Abstracts, AAPP 28th Annual Meeting, May 14-15, 2016 Atlanta, GA
Association for the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry

28th ANNUAL MEETING May 14-15, 2016 Atlanta, GA

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES IN SCIENTIFIC PSYCHIATRY:
RDOC, DSM, MECHANISMS, AND MORE

Conference co-chairs: Şerife Tekin & Peter Zachar

Keynote speakers:

Scott O. Lilienfeld, Ph.D. Emory University

Uma Vaidyanathan, Ph.D. National Institute of Mental Health, RDoC Unit

The science of psychiatry advances by means of empirical research. Scientific cultures, however, rely upon on non-empirical commitments such as methodological preferences, criteria for good constructs, and decisions about how to allocate limited resources to a superfluity of scientific goals. For instance shortly before the publication of the DSM-5 ̧the National Institute of Mental Health announced the goal of ultimately replacing the DSM as a guide for scientific research in psychiatry. Their preferred alternative is called the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), a classification matrix of basic psychological capacities that lend themselves for explanation by relevant biological mechanisms. In some respects RDoC is as much a philosophical revolution as a scientific one.

Accompanying this transition is the burgeoning body of first person accounts of patients, narrating the experience of mental disorder and psychiatric treatment, adding to the sources of knowledge in psychiatry.

Both these transitions in the psychiatric landscape create further impetus to revisit important topics pertaining to scientific research in psychopathology, not only among psychiatrists and psychologists, but also among philosophers and historians of science who specialize in thinking about the nature of scientific research and progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the RDoC framework for psychiatric research?
 How could recent philosophical work on mechanisms contribute to RDoC’s promise to develop a causal understanding of psychopathology?
Should latent variables be considered causes of behavior?
 To what does construct validity refer in a psychiatric context?
Categories of mental disorder may not carve nature at the joints. Do competing dimensional models?
 Can research in the history and theory of psychopathology contribute to the progress of scientific psychiatry? How can the work on values in feminist philosophy of science address the various tensions that exist between scientist versus practitioner perspectives?
 What are the implications of the differences between folk psychological and scientific psychological concepts on scientific research on mental disorders?
 Can patients’ experiences with mental illness contribute to scientific progress, or are they incommensurable?

Presentations will be strictly limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for discussion.

Abstracts will be blind reviewed, so the author’s identifying information should be attached separately.

Abstracts should be 500-600 words and sent via email by November 15, 2015 to Şerife Tekin (stekin@daemen.edu) and Peter Zachar (pzachar@aum.edu). Notices of acceptance or rejection will be distributed in January.

http://philosophyandpsychiatry.org/2015/07/09/call-for-abstracts-aapp-28th-annual-meeting-may-14-15-2016-atlanta-ga/

 

 
Christian Perring, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Dowling College

http://christianperring.com/

Editor of Metapsychology Online Reviews: http://metapsychology.mentalhelp.net/
Office Phone: (631) 244-3349
Dept Philosophy, Dowling College, 150 Idle Hour Blvd, Oakdale, NY 11769, USA

 

Conf: Ground, Essence, and Modality

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Tuomas E. Tahko <tuomas.tahko@helsinki.fi>
Subject: CONF: Ground, Essence & Modality (GEM) @ Helsinki, 8-10 June 2016

 

Conference Announcement
Ground, Essence & Modality (GEM) at Helsinki, 8-10 June 2016

Ground, essence & modality seem to have something to do with each other. Can we provide unified foundations for ground and essence, or should we treat both as primitives? Can modality be grounded in essence, or should essence be expressed in terms of modality? Does grounding entail necessitation? Are the notions of ground and essence uinivocal? This conference focuses on the links — or lack thereof — between these three notions, as well as the foundations of ground, essence & modality more generally. Sceptical approaches are also discussed.

Provisional list of speakers
Fabrice Correia
Kit Fine
Kathrin Koslicki
Jonathan Schaffer
Benjamin Schnieder
Tuomas Tahko
Barbara Vetter
Jessica Wilson

Further speakers to be announced. 4-5 slots will be reserved for an open CFP (to be posted in the autumn).

In addition, there are plans to arrange the second Humboldt workshop financed by Kit Fine’s Anneliese Maier Research Award and coordinated by the Phlox research group immediately prior to the conference. The workshop would likely be on the topic of the history of ground (especially Bolzano) and would take place 6-7 June 2016. Delegates of the conference are welcome to attend the workshop. Further updates will follow in due course.

Local organizer in Helsinki: Tuomas Tahko
Collaborators: Fabrice Correia & Benjamin Schnieder

Research projects involved:
Grounding – Metaphysics, Science & Logic (Correia & Schnieder) (https://groundingproject.wordpress.com/)
Essential Knowledge and The Epistemology of Metaphysics (Tahko) (http://ttahko.net/essential-knowledge/)
Essences, Identities and Individuals (Correia)

Dr. Tuomas E. Tahko
University Lecturer (Associate Professor)
Academy Research Fellow
Theoretical Philosophy
University of Helsinki
www.ttahko.net

 

Conf: Consciousness

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Anderson, Jami ( Philosophy Department ) <jamia@umflint.edu>
Subject: 2nd call: CFA Consciousness Conference Flint MI USA October 16-17

 
Consciousness Conference

 

 

 

University of Michigan-Flint

Philosophy Department

544 French Hall

303 East Kearsley Street

Flint, Michigan 48502

 

Insight Institute of Neurosurgery

and Neuroscience

4800 South Saginaw Street

Flint, Michigan 48507

 

cognethic.org

 

Dr. Jami L. Anderson

Co-Director

 

Dr. Jawad A. Shah

Co-Director

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

October 16–17, 2015
Insight Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience
Flint, Michigan
The theme should be interpreted broadly. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* In what way (if any) has recent research in the neurosciences altered our notions of consciousness? How (if at all) is neuroscience research relevant to questions about the nature of consciousness?
* What is the relation between consciousness and attention? Between consciousness and intentionality?
* How can we account for the unity of consciousness?
* What are the prospects of existing theories of consciousness (such as e.g., representationalist theories, higher-order theories, reflexive theories, non-physical theories)?
* Will we ever be able to explain phenomenal consciousness satisfactorily?
* Do thoughts have their own (proprietary) conscious phenomenology? What exactly is consciousness?
* Is consciousness experienced by humans only? Is consciousness experienced by all humans?
* Is consciousness a capacity that can be developed? Do social structures support (or inhibit) consciousness or does it exist independent of political and legal institutions?
* Is having consciousness of significance to being morally significant or of having moral standing?

Submissions
Submissions of abstracts (not exceeding 1000 words) are invited for presentation of talks (plan for a 20 minute talk). Please submit your abstract through conference website: http://www.cognethic.org/conference_pro_2015b.html. Proposals for panels and co-presentations are also permitted. All submissions should be of previously non-published work.

We welcome submissions from a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, the neurosciences, the pharmaceutical and medical sciences, the social sciences, critical studies (including gender and sexuality studies, disability studies, race studies, and critical legal theory…), law, education, linguistics, as well as other relevant disciplines and fields.

The deadline for proposal submission is July 31, 2015. Please direct all questions, comments, and concerns to Jami L. Anderson at anderson@cognethic.org.

Vol. 4, no. 1 of the Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics (JCN) will be based on the proceedings of the October 2015 CCN conference. All papers presented at the Consciousness conference will be eligible for inclusion in this issue of JCN. For additional journal and contact information, see http://www.cognethic.org/jcn.html.

The Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics is a peer-reviewed, open access journal published online, aimed at the cross-fertilization of research in neuroscience and related medical fields with scholarship in normative disciplines that address and analyze the legal, social and ethical implications of institutional policies. JCN is committed to presenting wide-ranging discussions. We are looking to publish works that explore ideas, concepts, theories and their implications across multiple disciplines and professions.

The Center for Cognition and Neuroethics promotes both the exploration of the conceptual foundations of the neurosciences and the study of the implications of their advances for society in the legal, political, and ethical realms. The CCN will disseminate this knowledge to as wide an audience as possible through publications, seminars, and other media. We engage in activities across multiple disciplines and professions that allow opportunities for intellectual synergy and increased impact by creating, fostering and supporting research and educational collaborations and communication. For more information about CCN see http://www.cognethic.org/.

 

Conf: Experimental Philosophy

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Kevin Reuter <kevinreuter@me.com>
Subject: 2nd CFP: Experimental Philosophy: Workshop in Germany

 

Workshop Experimental Philosophy

in Bochum, 26.-28.Nov. 2015

Organization: Albert Newen, Kevin Reuter, Pascale Willemsen
Institut für Philosophie II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum

The first conference of the Experimental Philosophy Group Germany will take part from Thursday, 26th November to Saturday, 28th November, 2015 at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. The workshop will cover a wide range of topics dealt with in experimental philosophy: moral cognition, causal cognition, aesthetics, philosophy of language and concepts, just to name a few. Our aim is to bring together researchers in philosophy, psychology, and the social sciences whose research touches any of the aforementioned topics, and to provide a platform for exchanging ideas.

Keynote Speakers:
Elke Brendel (University of Bonn)
Joshua Knobe (Yale University)
Edouard Machery (University of Pittsburgh)
Aaron Meskin (University of Leeds)

Further Speakers:
Roland Bluhm (TU Dortmund)
Nathalie Gold (King’s College London)
Joachim Horvath (University of Cologne)
Albert Newen (Ruhr University Bochum)
Kevin Reuter (Ruhr University Bochum)
Hannes Rusch (University of Cologne, Technical University of Munich)
Hanno Sauer (University of Duisburg-Essen)
Joshua Shepherd (Oxford University)
Pascale Willemsen (Ruhr University Bochum)

Call for Papers/Posters:
We invite submissions from philosophy and empirical science for papers and posters related to the topics of the conference.
Please submit an extended abstract of 500 words using the Easychair website.

Exemplary topics:
- Experimental Philosophy of Mind and Language
- Causal and Moral Judgement
- Experimental Aesthetics
- Experimental Philosophy of Epistemology
- Meta-Philosophical Aspects
- …
Abstract Submission Deadline: 1st August 2015

For the latest information concerning the workshop visit our homepage: https://sites.google.com/site/xphigroupgermany/home

 

Conf: Why Trust a Theory?

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: MCMP Phil-Sci <mcmp.philsci@lrz.uni-muenchen.de>
Subject: CfP: Why trust a theory (LMU Munich, 7-9 December 2015)

 
*********************************************

WHY TRUST A THEORY?

RECONSIDERING SCIENTIFIC METHODOLOGY IN LIGHT OF MODERN PHYSICS

LMU Munich

7-9 December 2015

www.lmu.de/whytrustatheory2015

*********************************************

Fundamental physics today faces increasing difficulties to find conclusive
empirical confirmation of its theories. Some empirically unconfirmed or
inconclusively confirmed theories in the field have nevertheless attained
a high degree of trust among their exponents and are de facto treated as
well established theories. This situation raises a number of questions
that are of substantial importance for the future development of
fundamental physics. Can a high degree of trust in an empirically
unconfirmed or inconclusively confirmed theory be scientifically
justified? Does the extent to which empirically unconfirmed theories are
trusted today constitute a substantial change of the character of
scientific reasoning? Might some important theories of contemporary
fundamental physics be empirically untestable in principle?

The workshop will be centred around an in-depth discussion of these and
other related questions, with a particular focus on the methodological and
philosophical aspects. As such, it will be an interdisciplinary event,
involving physicists and philosophers of science. It will bring together
main exponents of important theories in fundamental physics, physicists
who have expressed criticism of the current strategies of theory
assessment in fundamental physics and philosophers who have thought about
those issues.

INVITED SPEAKERS:
Peter Achinstein (Johns Hopkins University)
Matthias Bartelmann (University of Heidelberg)
Radin Dardashti (LMU Munich)
Richard Dawid (LMU Munich)
Gia Dvali (LMU Munich)
George Ellis (University of Cape Town)
David Gross (UC Santa Barbara and Kavli Institute)
Sabine Hossenfelder (NORDITA, Stockholm)
Nick Huggett (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Gordon Kane (University of Michigan)
Viatcheslav Mukhanov (LMU Munich)
Massimo Pigliucci (CUNY, New York)
Joseph Polchinski (UC Santa Barbara and Kvali Institute)
Carlo Rovelli (University of Aix Marseilles)
Joseph Silk (Johns Hopkins Univ. & Universite Pierre et Marie Curie)
Chris Smeenk (Western University)
Karim Thébault (LMU Munich)
Chris Wüthrich (University of Geneva)


Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Lehrstuhl für Wissenschaftstheorie
Sekretariat Professor Hartmann
Ludwigstr. 31/I
80539 München

Tel.: 089-2180-3319
FAX: 089-2180-17752

 

Conf: Knowing How

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Yves Bouchard <Yves.Bouchard@usherbrooke.ca>
Subject: CFA: CSE 2015 Knowing How

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

 

* KNOWING HOW *

 

International Symposium

November 6-7, 2015

University of Montreal

Quebec, Canada

 

Organized by the

Canadian Society for Epistemology

 

Deadline for submission: Monday September 14.

 

Knowing how is a strange epistemic category. From the very beginning of philosophy, philosophers made a distinction between techne and episteme, the first one having basically no philosophical value and considered to be secondary. This has been more or less the standard philosophical position and it still is to some extent. Recent work on the subject has tried to show that knowing how could be reduced to knowing that. However, research in cognitive sciences sheds a new light on some aspects of knowing how and its relationships to knowing that. This year’s symposium will be devoted to exploring the various dimensions of these issues. What is the nature of knowing how? How is it related to knowing that? What areas of knowledge are touched by knowing how? What is the philosophical value of knowing how?

 

The languages of the symposium are English and French. Authors are invited to submit a 250 word abstract (in English or in French) for a paper of 20-30 minutes reading time. The deadline for submitting an abstract is Monday September 14. Abstracts can be submitted online.

 

For more information, visit the Symposium website at

 

http://sce-cse.recherche.usherbrooke.ca

 

or write to

 

Yves Bouchard yves.bouchard@usherbrooke.ca

David Matheson david_matheson@carleton.ca

 

 

 

Yves Bouchard

Department of Philosophy and Applied Ethics

Université de Sherbrooke

2500, boulevard de l’Université

Sherbrooke (Quebec) J1K 2R1 Canada

Phone 819-821-8000 ext. 62335

Fax 819-821-7677

 

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